Fact Sheet: Women in Politics

Women representation in Government

The Beijing Platform for Action (1995) called on governments to take measures to ensure women’s equal access to and full participation in power structures and decision-making

General Assembly (2000) 23rd Special Session reiterated the need to increase the representation of women.

UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000) affirmed the need to include women in decision-making with regard to issues of peace and security

African Commitments

Dakar Platform for Action (1994)

African Plan of Action to Accelerate the Implementation of the Dakar and Beijing Platforms for Action for the Advancement of Women (1999)

Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa (2003)

African Union’s Solemn Declaration on Gender Equality in Africa (2004).

 

Cameroon National Assembly

Election

No. of Seats

No. of Women

% Women

Ranking

2007

180

25

13.9

85/188

2002

180

16

8.9

87/181

1997

180

10

5.6

73/177

1992

180

22

12.2

38/177

Average % Women in Parliaments World 19.6% and Sub Saharan Africa 19.8%

 

Election

Total Councilors

No. of Women

% Women

No. female Mayors

1996

9932

1061

10.70%

2

2002

9963

1302

13.70%

10

2007

10632

1651

15.50%

24 / 360

Some Key Events

1893 New Zealand is the first country to give all women the right to vote

1920 United States gives women the right to vote

1946 Cameroon gives women the right to vote and stand for election

1960 Sri Lanka is the first country to elect a female Prime Minister, Sirivamo Bandaranaike

1960 Cameroon elects first female Parliamentarian

There have been 54 woman Prime Ministers in many countries, including Mozambique, Senegal and recently Mali

1971 Switzerland gives women the vote

1979 United Kingdom Margaret Thatcher becomes Prime Minister and is re-elected twice before resigning in 1990

1989 Namibia gives women the vote

2003 Rwanda elects 39 women to parliament, making it the country with the highest (49%) proportion of women in the world

2005 Liberia becomes the first African country to have a female President, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.

2008 Rwanda elects 56% of  women to parliament retaining its number one ranking

2011 Mali elects its first female Prime Minister

 

Women in elected positions in NWR

Women in Councils in the North West Region

Divisions

No. of Councils

Total Councilors

 No. of Women

% Women

2007

2002

2007

2002

2007

2002

2007

2002

Menchum

4

4

110

110

16

16

  14.5

  14.5

Boyo

4

4

116

116

18

16

  15.5

  13.8

Ngoketunjia

3

3

107

101

19

16

  17.8

  15.8

Donga-Mantung

5

4

173

148

17

11

    9.8

    7.4

Momo

5

5

141

141

24

17

  17.0

  12.1

Bui

6

6

202

202

36

35

  17.8

  17.3

Mezam

7

5

239

191

47

35

  19.7

  18.3

TOTAL NWR

34

31

1088

1009

177

146

  16.3

  14.5

Parliamentarians

One of the 20 members of parliaments elected in 2007 from the NWR is a woman. Between 1997 and 2007 there were no female parliamentarians from our region.

Actions to be taken

1. Political capacity building for Women who are aspiring to stand for elected positions

2. Identification and selection of the most competitive potential candidates 

3. Lobby meeting for women leaders at Delegation of Women Empowerment to mobilise candidates and support for women candidates

4. Reflect on fund raising strategies, especially at the grassroots

 

2012 Municipal and Legislative Elections

Let’s make it happen

Mobilize 1,000 Women, Youth and Minority Candidates

330+ women Councilors in the North West

5+ women Mayors (not Deputies!) in the North West

5+ women Parliamentarians from the North West

 

 Statements by NW Women

Elizabeth People mobilized against me because I am a non native. Women tarnished my image that I am a bad woman.  I was taken to the palace and stoned after 53 points were read against me.  I was blackmailed and physically assaulted.”

 

Florence “I sent in my candidature. Secret meetings were held and the names of women removed from the list.  Women wrote a series of petition letters but the situation was not redressed.”

 

Elizabeth “ I was secretary of the party, as elections were approaching I was not informed and I was not given a chance to run for the post of a councilor on the basis that I was too young and a non native of the village.  I was sexually harassed by men and my colleagues campaigned against me.”

 

Celine “I was confident to be reelected for another five years.  I campaigned for an aspirant in the same party from another village and at the parliamentary primaries. My local constituency got angry and said I will not be a councilor anymore.  I submitted my candidature at the primaries but a gang of people came to me and said that I will not be voted. Grassroots women were threatened not to vote for me and that if they do their houses will be burnt down. I lost to my opponent with a narrow margin of two votes.

 

Women in Councils 2007-2011

 

Ref

Division Council

Councilors

Gender for specific positions

Dep

Total

Male

Female

Mayor

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

M

F

1

Boyo Belo

41

33

8

M

M

M

F

M

3

1

2

Boyo Fonfuka

25

23

2

M

M

M

 –

 –

2

0

3

Boyo Fundong

25

18

7

M

F

M

 –

 –

1

1

4

Boyo Njinikom

25

24

1

M

?

?

 –

 –

?

?

5

Bui Elak-Oku

41

33

8

M

?

?

?

?

2

2

6

Bui Jakiri

35

32

3

M

F

M

M

M

3

1

7

Bui Kumbo

41

31

10

M

?

?

?

?

3

1

8

Bui Mbiame

25

19

6

M

?

?

 –

 –

1

1

9

Bui Nkum

35

31

4

M

F

M

?

?

?

?

10

Bui Nkor

25

20

5

M

M

F

 –

 –

1

1

11

Donga-Mantung Ako

25

23

2

M

M

M

 –

 –

2

0

12

Donga-Mantung Misaje

25

20

5

M

M

M

 –

 –

2

0

13

Donga-Mantung Ndu

41

40

1

M

M

M

M

M

4

0

14

Donga-Mantung Nkambé

41

35

6

M

?

?

?

?

?

?

15

Donga-Mantung Nwa

41

38

3

M

M

M

M

M

4

0

16

Menchum Benakuma

25

20

5

M

?

?

 –

 –

1

1

17

Menchum Furu-Awa

25

24

1

M

?

?

 –

 –

?

?

18

Menchum Wum

25

20

5

M

F

M

 –

 –

1

1

19

Menchum Zhoa

35

30

5

M

M

F

M

M

3

1

20

Mezam Bafut

35

30

5

M

M

M

F

M

3

1

21

Mezam Bali

35

27

8

M

?

?

?

?

3

1

22

Mezam Bamenda I

31

26

5

M

?

?

 –

 –

1

1

23

Mezam Bamenda II

31

26

5

M

M

M

 –

 –

2

0

24

Mezam Bamenda III

31

22

10

M

F

M

 –

 –

1

1

25

Mezam Santa

41

34

7

M

M

M

M

F

3

1

26

Mezam Tubah

35

28

7

M

M

F

M

M

3

1

27

Momo Andek

25

21

4

M

?

?

 –

 –

?

?

28

Momo Batibo

41

34

7

M

?

?

?

?

3

1

29

Momo Mbengwi

25

19

6

M

?

?

 –

 –

1

1

30

Momo Njikwa

25

22

3

M

M

M

 –

 –

2

0

31

Momo Widikum-Boffe

25

21

4

M

?

?

 –

 –

?

?

32

Ngo-ketunjia Babessi

35

27

8

M

?

?

?

?

3

1

33

Ngo-ketunjia Balikumbat

31

25

6

M

F

M

 –

 –

1

1

34

Ngo-ketunjia Ndop

41

36

5

M

M

M

M

M

4

0

 

 

TOTAL

1088

912

177

 

 

 

%

100%

84%

16%

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Political Empowerment, Women Empowerment by COMINSUD. Bookmark the permalink.

About COMINSUD

Community Initiative for Sustainable Development (COMINSUD) is an organisation dedicated to sustainable development in the Northwest Region of Cameroon. COMINSUDs main office is located in Ntarinkon but she works throughout the North West Region to improve the lives and livelihoods of Cameroonians. Focusing on projects and programs of democracy, women's empowerment and good governance, COMINSUD aims to work with rural communities towards a better and more sustainable future.